Method Gel Handwashes


Method Gel Handwashes

Method are an eco-friendly brand who create handwashes, dish soaps, laundry gels and other home care products.  They are great for use in a family home as they are non-toxic and are free from harsh chemicals.

Both my daughter and I have quite bad reactions to some chemicals used in soaps and ‘smellies’ so it was good to see that this Method Gel Handwash is mild enough for every day use.

Waterfalls!

And here’s the one I was sent!  Handily it matches my bathroom very nicely, as well as erm…smelling of waterfalls.  Right, a quick question for you – what do waterfalls actually smell of?  From personal experience, depending on the waterfall they tend to smell of ozone (sea breezeish) and slightly foisty if it’s a waterfall by a river.

To me, this handwash has a vague hint of traditional Fairy Liquid with a dash of sweet rose.  It doesn’t smell like waterfalls at all, but I don’t suppose that will bother many of you.  Without a doubt, it does smell nice and it cleans as well as any handwash should – and that’s what matters!  It doesn’t seem to dry my hands out too much either after use and leaves a light fragrance after rinsing.

They come in four colours and fragrances: Lavender, Pink Grapefruit, Sweet Water and Waterfall and retail from £2.49 and come in 345ml bottles.

Lavender!

I think it’s great that the bottles are all made from recycled materials and contain  naturally-derived, biodegradable ingredients containing vitamin E and aloe.  They are paraben and triclosan -free too and these products have never been tested on animals. The above paraben and triclosan are two ingredients commonly found in household cleaning products, and are a tricky subject worth researching if you have the time.

Pink Grapefruit!

I was however, disappointed to see lauryl sulphate on the ingredients list.  This is the agent that creates the froth when you combine it with water.  Many eco-friendly and health conscious brands do try to avoid that particular ingredient if possible.  Once again, if you have 10 minutes spare, it’s worth googling the topic.

Sweet Water!

All in all, I do like this handwash.  It’s handy because of the pump action top, it’s an attractive colour and it doesn’t react with sensitive skin as far as I can see.  The fragrance is pleasant and not overpowering and it is obviously a brand with an eco-conscience – something always worth supporting.

If you’d like to find out more about Method’s family friendly home care products, please click HERE!

In response to the Laureth Sulphate issue, Method had this to say.  I think it something you have to research and make your own mind up about to be honest. 

Sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) in method products

SLS is mistakenly assumed to be a hazardous ingredient, but has been assessed and found completely safe in its use as a coconut-oil derived surfactant in method products.

 SLS is frequently assumed to be a carcinogen, though this is simply incorrect – it is not classified as a known, probable or suspected carcinogen by either the International Agency for Research on Cancer (www.iarc.fr) or the American Cancer Society (www.cancer.org), which was gone so far as to issue a statement to this effect.

 While the carcinogen concern is incorrect, SLS is a moderate eye and skin irritant when used in high concentrations and unbuffered. Method uses it only in formulations at sufficiently low concentrations that it is not irritating. With the exception of this irritation concern, SLS is a good ingredient – it is derived from coconut oil, it is biodegradable, and is non-toxic.

 When deciding to use SLS (sodium lauryl sulfate) in some of our formulations, method made a complete assessment of the environmental and health aspects of these ingredients. This was done in cooperation with the EPEA, an independent environmental research institute led by Dr Michael Braungart, author of the landmark text Cradle to Cradle. The ingredient assessment concluded that SLS is safe in its intended usage, and that the carcinogenicity concerns are not relevant. A summary of EPEA’s assessment of SLS is available on request.

 

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